The secret of Iceland’s free electricity

April 6, 2009 Comments disabled

In the last few years the underground lakes which fuel Iceland’s famous geysers have been put to use lighting up those long winter nights – more than 25% of Iceland’s electricity is produced from geothermal energy and almost all homes in Iceland get their heating from hot water out of the ground. Not surprisingly, Icelandic companies like Exorka are among the most advanced in the world in new geothermal technologies.

Geothermal energy uses heat from under the earth’s surface either for heating or for producing electricity. When the underground temperature is hot enough (like in Iceland), electricity can be produced directly from the steam or hot water found beneath the surface.

It’s an emerging form of electricity generation but one which has a lot of potential – it’s reliable and doesn’t cause emissions or pollution. Even better, you don’t need to worry about rising fuel costs because the energy is free. This is good news given Iceland’s precarious financial situation.

How to reduce emissions without cutting growth
How will Nano affect the environment?

About the author

Lucy (Liz) Chatburn
Lucy is English and first ventured out of the UK she was 19. Since then she has lived in 4 different countries and tried to see as much of the world as possible. She loves learning languages, learning about different cultures and hearing different points of view.
Other 502 posts by