Spicing up Indian cuisine

October 2, 2013 Comments disabled , , ,

When it comes to the context of the Indian cuisine, you will certainly get a lot of variety served up on your platter. Though it is more of a general notion that Indian cuisine is a spicy and hot affair! Yet there are certain other varieties that are there which believe in using not so fiery spices and make for a delicious affair.

Chicken tikka

Chicken tikka

Photo credit BBC

It is generally more found along the coastal area such as Kerala and Goa in the southern part of India. Not being so fiery in taste and having the subtle effect of using coconut milk and the sea food combination makes for some of the best conventional dishes.

If you can make it to the North East of India, there you have the more boiled and the steamed varieties of food of Mongolian origin. It has given birth to Momo’s, Thukpas and Noodles. On the extreme contrast, you have the spicy flavors of north India especially Punjab, Delhi where you have the spicy Chicken Tikka to the spicy Fruit Chat making for an exorbitant affair

 Moving west to Gujarat and Rajasthan, you have the more spicy varieties of the vegetarian varieties. To round off, looking up in the place where I belong is famous all over the globe for dishes of fishes and sweets .Certainly known for being the food joint with dishes of Hilsa and prawn and rounding it off with dessert dishes such as Rosogolla and Sweet Curd makes the picture of the Indian cuisine complete, which has got more than the variety of spicy food.

 

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About the author

Ana Astri-O'Reilly
Ana Astri-O’Reilly is from Argentina, where she lived until five years ago. She currently lives in Dallas, USA with her British husband, but they move a lot. Previously a translator and English and Spanish teacher, Ana first started writing to share her experiences and adventures with friends and family. She speaks Spanish, English and a smattering of Portuguese.
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